What is Google Analytics?

Google Analytics is an interesting tool to use and can be very beneficial when keeping track of statistics that can be used for marketing strategies for your website.

Behavioural Patterns in Customers

By understanding and looking into the behavioural patterns of your customers you can tailor your marketing and context to match this alongside testing which strategies are working better than others. 

So, by giving you information regarding your customer’s behaviours like what device they use or whether your audience has an age/gender/demographic pattern it can show what will work in terms of making the right impression. This data is also presented in an easy manner through charts and graphs, by segregating each demographic it will make the analysis easier to interpret.  

Specifically, it can help with SEO strategies. By having access to specific data such as the demographics, interests, and behaviour patterns of your traffic you can use that to tailor your keyword generation for example. So, by using keywords that clearly resonate with the traffic being brought to your site, it will highly optimize your digital appearance on google as well as improve your ranking… This information can further be used to build your content up on your website and socials again tailoring it to any data provided by google analytics. This provides an opportunity for trial and experimentation to see whether your SEO strategies will reflect on your build-up of traffic to the website.

One issue we find when offering SEO and access to google analytics to show a client’s performance is that it won’t happen overnight. Strategies need time to show activity. Especially as this source of data shows google traffic brought to the site it can be frustrating when these numbers aren’t always converted into leads so this needs time and patience to show some really valuable data!

Understanding your website’s data and performance will put you ahead of your competition!

The Impact of Word of Mouth & Influencer Marketing

Both of these strategies of marketing are very effective and work for hand in hand; an influencer complimenting a product and showing how desired it is, makes customers want it (especially if said influencer had a large following of the intended targeted audience). If this type of marketing is done correctly then it can be greatly beneficial in creating sales and creating a large awareness of the brand, product, or service. 

However, like many marketing strategies, this needs to adhere to your business and its needs. By being a small local business you may not have the funds to pay for sponsorship for example and so positive word of mouth would need to be taken advantage of. Word of mouth can be spread through social media and so having a presence across certain platforms would greatly help this, as the public will be able to comment/review your product or service on your platforms. It’ll be the first place a potential customer will look to see if it’s worth investing in. The issue with word of mouth is that unfortunately negative reviews spread quicker and are seen by more compared to positive reviews which can’t be helped, customers may purposely search for negative reviews to make a decision as to whether it’s worth their visit. It may sound obvious but it’s important to realize how customers behave especially when they choose where to take their business, M. Nick Hajili stated in the International Journal of Market Research that:

 

“Trust, encouraged by social media, significantly affects intention to buy. Therefore, trust has a significant role in eCommerce by directly influencing intention to buy and indirectly to influence perceived usefulness.”

Alongside using word of mouth online it’s also very effective face to face as 92% of consumers stated that they would trust a family or friend’s opinion on a product/ service compared to the advertisement, this was found in a report by Nielson. 

This is not to say however that a small business can’t use influencer marketing, if by chance an influencer stops by your store and posts about your product/service or if a said business decided to send an influencer or celebrity a package of their goods known as a PR package in hopes they may review your products to their followers without paying a large cost for a potential positive fake review. PR packages should be very specific and require research into who to send what, this could either be the make or break of your brand.

Even though this all looks pretty pessimistic regarding negative reviews or negative word of mouth but think of it as customer feedback, unfortunately, it is very public and could be detrimental but it also highlights how to better your business, which you can do for your future customers. This leads us to the fake reviews and some customers’ opinions on influencer marketing;

Fake reviews from paid promotions can be beneficial but not if they put your business in a position where they can’t offer it, for example, a spot cream that’s meant to reduce the look of spots might be marketed by the influencer as completely disappearing them… for future customers, it can cause confusion and may do more harm than good, so it’s important that the influencer won’t just say positive things just because you’re paying them to, you want them to be honest with your future customers. Alongside this, customers’ opinions on this type of promotion can be fairly negative as they feel that the influencers are only saying positive things because they are getting paid for it, providing a fake review. This would probably give the influencer more negative feedback than intended. Still, it will also reflect badly on your brand- you’re willing to pay someone just to say something good about your product- the fact that you need to go to those lengths for a positive review may do more harm than good on your brand image. This could be argued as 61% of consumers said they trusted influencer reviews and recommendations which is still over half of the intended audience showing it has some significance over opinions (source thesocialshephard.com

In general, if you wish to take your brand into these types of marketing strategies, it’s important it’s done properly and with extensive research to ensure it’s done correctly, picking certain influencers that correspond with your products (makeup influencers given makeup products to try) and encouraging customer feedback directly to the business can be worth it for your businesses future.

Digital Marketing in the Year of Covid-19

During this year, businesses have become more reliant than ever on their digital strategy. Without wanting to sound too alarmist, in many cases, it has been the deciding factor in whether they make it through the tough times now and the months ahead.

The unprecedented, almost-total disappearance of all channels related to live events and conferences, and the increasing barriers to face-to-face business, pose an enormous challenge. The key to resilience is the development of ongoing contingencies to mitigate this loss.

B2B companies have relied on the annual circuit of trade shows and exhibitions to network and build customer relations. In industries that are not digital-native, they may also be less sophisticated in their digital growth and customer relations strategies.

For smaller businesses, especially, those used to getting new customers through word-of-mouth referrals or on the strength of a hard-won reputation, their loss is coming as a shock.

Larger companies are also now finding themselves in the position of having potentially lost millions through cancelled activities and events and cannot claw back the hours of time and expense spent on preparations for this year, but insurance and flexible cancellation policies will leave them with a marketing budget to reassign.

Digital is the clear winner here, and companies including ones that may not so much as had a Facebook page before will need to move into social marketing, content marketing, SEO and influencer-led campaigns.

Of course, this means there are opportunities out there for the taking if you are a B2B supplier in an industry that has been slow to adapt to digital marketing. A key factor in resilience is adaptability. If it’s standard in your industry to go out and meet new customers face-to-face before you do business, adapting may mean opening new channels over the web or social media platforms where introductions are made and relationships are fostered.

In the coming months, your prospective clients are going to be less open to the idea of letting you walk through the door and shake their hand – and no one really has any idea how long this will last and whether this will lead to longer-term change.

Being confined to the office or even the home rather than on the road on sales visits or at events, means marketers have more time to develop digital strategies. This means researching where your customers can be found online and how different approaches and tactics might impact your success. If your organisation previously put token efforts into digital channels because like a lot of other businesses, you had built your networks offline and that had always seemed to work now is the time to revisit them.

That could be as simple as giving your website and social pages a refresh, or a more innovative approach. It’s undoubtedly true that the coming weeks, or months or however long this situation lasts will be a challenging time for any company that isn’t ready to think about how they will replace the opportunities that have been lost.

As long as businesses approach the shift to digital marketing strategically, there’s no reason why it should just serve as an emergency strategy but could carry on providing long-term value when the world eventually gets back to normal. And of course, it would make companies more resilient to deal with any future pandemics.