What is Web 3.0 and How is it Changing Web Design Trends?

Web 3.0 is powered by artificial intelligence and machine learning. It provides relevant search results based on the full context of the user’s question rather than the terms entered. It protects your data from abuse. Moreover, decentralised technologies like blockchain are at the heart of this web design.

Web 3.0’s Essential Components

New York Times writer John Markoff coined the term “Web 3.0” in 2006. The following five characteristics may help define this concept:

  • The Semantic Web identifies the meanings of words rather than just their keywords to improve web technologies’ capacity for content creation, distribution, and integration.
  • Artificial Intelligence allows computers to interpret information on a human-like level by combining natural language processing with semantic skills, allowing them to provide timely and precise solutions. They improve their IQ and foster higher patron contentment.
  • Web 3.0 sites and services heavily incorporate three-dimensional (3D) design. It can be found in many different settings, such as maps, video games, museum brochures, and more.
  • Semantic metadata improves information’s interconnectedness, leading to increased accessibility. As a result, your perceptions will shift, and you’ll be able to deepen your connections by making the most of all available information.
  • It’s decentralised, so you’re free to share or conceal information as you see fit. Because your actions occur in a decentralised environment, you have more flexibility and control over handling your data.

1. Greater Emphasis on Anonymity and Decentralisation

The decentralised web uses blockchain technology to eliminate the need for third-party administrators. It does so by relying solely on unalterable encrypted data. This would have the practical effect of removing data ownership from individual operators. You would have complete control over this data as it accompanied you to different websites.

Nowadays, every website you visit keeps track of information about you in its own database, many of which sell or otherwise profit from this data. This necessitates fundamental shifts in how designers gain access to and preserve information about their users.

2. Multiple-System Data Sources

Since people will now have control over their data, it will incorporate information from anywhere the person has gone online. This allows designers to create much more unique and memorable experiences. But now that you know this, what do you do with it?

Learning to manage data from sensors, whether from trackers, camera feeds, or infusion pump sensors helps organise the business for handling the level of data. It also helps them benefit from the insights they can provide.

Depending on what information they find valuable for improving the brand’s product or service offering, web designers will need to narrow down, prioritise, and optimise these experiences.

3. The popularity of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality Experiences

More resource-intensive experiences like AR and VR are now possible thanks to advancements in processing power. Google even has a collection devoted to demonstrating these kinds of experiences. WebXR integrates augmented and virtual reality on the web to make them more accessible and practical.

4. Search Engine Optimisation

Web 3.0 is a more advanced version of the internet that uses machine learning to decipher digital media of all kinds. In the near future, search engines will prioritise providing accurate results on the first try, regardless of the user’s device.

However, they warn that in web 3.0, the battlegrounds for searches will be voice assistant questions, long-tail searches, and position zero results. It will become increasingly important for designers to correctly label these assets for search as systems like Amazon, Alexa, and Google Quick Answers start to display more multimedia content results.

How is Web 3.0 Changing Web Design Trends?

web design trend

Source: Navdeep Yadav, Mantra Labs

The usage of markup languages such as hypertext markup language (HTML), cascading style sheets (CSS), and JavaScript to build interactive and engaging websites is expected to increase in the future. WebGL, which allows developers to make interactive images, will become increasingly popular, as will voice control via gadgets like the Amazon Echo.

Simplifying website layouts, reducing reliance on third-party plugins, and increasing responsiveness to ensure a decent user experience across all devices are expected to become the norm soon. There has never been a better time to launch a brand-new website or improve an existing one. As time goes on, we should expect more frequent and rapid shifts in how the web works. Maintain your company’s edge in the modern digital marketplace by planning.

The following are a few ways in which Web 3.0 will affect web design:

  • Practical and user-friendly web development is on the horizon.
  • User immersion can be improved with CSS, JS, and HTML.
  • WebGL/canvas technology-based, graphically-rich illustrations.
  • The rise of voice-activated devices
  • Websites may eventually become more reactive and less dependent on plugins.
  • Websites that use HTML5, CSS3, and JS rather than Flash or Silverlight perform better.
  • Users with fewer plugins for online games may have a more satisfying experience.

There will likely be a shift toward a more minimalistic web design with fewer graphics to ensure they render correctly on all devices and platforms without hogging too much bandwidth.

Conclusion

Web 3.0 is a reality for today’s young demographic targets, including millennials and Generation Z. Technology is the centre of their universe. They’re looking for something more cerebral. The customer experience (CX) in the Web 3.0 age is predicated on user recommendations, autonomous chatbots, and advanced search results that use machine learning, enhanced connection, etc.

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